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You choose: Who are the top athletes in Sun history?

VOTING HAS ENDED: We reveal the top 10 ranked by readers at baltimoresun.com/sports starting May 8.

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  • Jimmie Foxx

    A three-time MVP, the Sudlersville native became the second major league player to hit 500 home runs. A fearsome hitter for the Philadelphia A's, he won the Triple Crown in 1933 and drove in more than 100 runs for 13 straight years.

  • Michael Phelps

    The Baltimore native won 16 Olympic medals — a record 14 of them gold — in two Olympics, with the London games looming. He has set 39 world records, seven of which still hold, and has been named world swimmer of the year six times.

  • Frank Robinson

    Helped the Orioles win two World Series (1966 and 1970) and became the first player ever to be named the MVP in the National League and American League. Became the first black major league manager, and won manager of the year for orchestrating the Orioles' drastic turnaround in 1989.

  • John Unitas

    Unitas led the Baltimore Colts to two NFL championships and a Super Bowl win, and was a 10-time Pro Bowl selection. The orchestrator of the Colt's game-winning, overtime drive in "The Greatest Game Ever Played," he was named NFL MVP three times.

  • Ray Lewis

    The second draft pick in Ravens history, Lewis has been one of the best middle linebackers in pro football for 16 seasons. A 13-time Pro Bowl selection, he was twice the NFL's defensive player of the year and was named MVP of the Ravens' Super Bowl win.

  • Jim Parker

    His crushing blocks launched Lenny Moore's runs and saved John Unitas' skin. He made All-Pro eight times from 1957 through 1967, started 139 straight games for the Colts and reached the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

  • Cal Ripken Jr.

    Best known for breaking Lou Gehrig's consecutive-games-played streak — it had held for 56 years — the Aberdeen native was a 19-time All-Star for the Orioles and twice won the AL MVP award.

  • Brooks Robinson

    An 18-time All-Star and 16-time Gold Glove Winner, Robinson is widely considered the greatest defensive third baseman of all time. He played 23 season with the O's and appeared in four World Series, and was the American League MVP in 1964.

  • Babe Ruth

    The Yankees legend — who grew up in Baltimore's Pigtown — ranks third all-time with 714 home runs (the record stood from 1935 to 1974). His on-field exploits and off-field persona boosted baseball's popularity in the 1920s, and he's considered by many to be the first true sports icon.

  • Wes Unseld

    The Bullet's first-round pick (second overall) in 1968, the 6-7 center averaged 18.2 rebounds and won Rookie of the Year and the NBA MVP award in 1969. He helped the Bullets reach four NBA finals and one championship, earning series MVP in 1978.